Riedman-Dangler Counseling Services

Virginia (Ginny) Riedman-Dangler, MS Ed., LCSW-R

919 Winton Rd. S. Suite 206

Rochester, NY 14618


Blog

view:  full / summary

Children and Learning Disabilities

Posted on July 27, 2016 at 3:56 PM Comments comments (13)
                                                        

Prior to my current work as a mental health therapist, I worked as an elementary school teacher. At times I reflect upon that work experience. I thoroughly enjoyed being a part of my students’ academic and social development. Yet it was most rewarding to play a role in their emotional development. I saw firsthand how encouragement and praise gave a child the confidence and motivation needed to be academically successful. It was this same encouragement and patience that helped a child see that a mistake is just that; that we all make them and we learn from them. I came to understand the importance of helping children find ways to appropriately express feelings; both happy and upsetting feelings; that this, also, is part of healthy emotional development.

There is also the reality of learning disabilities that some children do struggle with. Some children with learning disabilities can develop poor self-esteem despite their earnest efforts to do well in school.  Educators and parents of school aged children need to be educated about the various learning disabilities in order to support those who may have these challenges. Children can be successful and feel good about themselves with this support.

The following is a link to an article from the Child Mind Institute; Supporting The Emotional Needs of Kids With Learning Disabilities. I invite you to read it and comment about it on my blog.

 


 

 

Making A Difference To The Homeless

Posted on January 18, 2016 at 11:48 AM Comments comments (10)
           Making A Difference To The Homeless

As we move into winter I often reflect on the issue of homelessness. This is something most of us will never have to experience in our lifetime.

I was inspired a couple of weeks ago by a young child who stunned me, actually, with her awareness and feelings about homelessness. She explained to me how she feels sad when she looks out of the car window and notices a homeless individual on a street corner asking for money.

I think it is important for us to have the same awareness and compassion as this young child  and reflect upon how we can best support the homeless; especially during winter months. Remember, these individuals have had life goals, have had/do have families, and many are war veterans. Some found the courage to leave a relationship where there was domestic violence and many have severe mental health issues.

Perhaps with our support and care, we can contribute to empowering individuals, even in a small way, and help them become aware that their life does matter. For it is in this way the quality of their lives can improve.  All individuals deserve this!

How can you support the homeless? Feel free to add a comment.

Riedman-Dangler Counseling Services will be collecting items that can benefit the homeless such as socks, toiletries, winter coats……

Feel free to comment on this blog as well as making a contribution to this Kindness Project. The items can be brought to Riedman-Dangler Counseling Services on Tuesdays or Thursdays. Feel free to call 241-0101 if you have questions.

 
Catholic Family Center Housing and Homeless – 546-7220

Project Homeless Connect –546-6340

The Center for Youth - 24-hour hotline: 585 271-7670

Salvation Army – 987-9500


                        Everyone Deserves To Be Treated With Respect……

 

 

 

The Impact Poverty Has On Children's School Performance

Posted on August 7, 2015 at 11:51 AM Comments comments (17)


With the approaching 2015-2016 school year, I would like to reflect upon and address the issue of poverty and its’ impact on a child’s learning. First, I would like to site some staggering statistics in Rochester. This includes:

  • Rochester is the 5 poorest city in the country
  • 32.9% of the metropolitan population of Rochester are living below the federal poverty level
  •  Childhood poverty increased from 46 percent to 50 percent. It was stated that Rochester “is the only city of comparable size in the nation where more than half the children live in poverty.”
  • Many of the poor need to work 2 jobs and therefore the amount of quality time with children are decreased. An example, a parent not available to help with homework or read to their child.

                From: wsws.org   Feb. 2015

As I read these statistics, I can’t help but remember my past experience as a teacher in the city. There were times a child came to school without the needed school supplies, tired and unable to concentrate. Some came to school hungry. These are distressing occurrences that many of us never had to deal with growing up.

The impact of poverty on children, with school achievement in particular, is quite alarming. There have been extensive studies around this issue. Some of the findings include; children in poverty are more apt to be impacted by lead poisoning and/or suffer from asthma. It is known that lead poisoning can negatively impact a child’s ability to learn. Along with this, there has been much research in the past 20 years that supports evidence of the impact stress has on brain development.

For many children,  growing up in poverty can be stressful. For example, chronic stress can cause nutrients in ones’ body to be depleted. Hence, a higher risk of inattentiveness and slowed learning.

(Karen M. Pellino; The Effects of Poverty on Learning) 

Characteristics of an environment not in poverty are those that foster academic learning and  success in school. In an environment where there is poverty, parents may need to work two jobs to make ends meet.  In doing so they may not be available in a way that supports their child’s learning, such as reading to their child.  There may not be extra income to provide their child with rich and meaningful learning experiences such as taking their child to the museum or the zoo.

The Kindness Projectwill be collecting school items for children/families in need. Some items include; crayons, pens/pencils, folders, child scissors, paper and small books for parents to read to their child. Also, if individuals are familiar with a family that may be struggling as they make plans for their child’s school needs, reach out to them in ways you can support them with the beginning of the school year!     
                                
     "We can make a positive difference in the lives of children and families." 

Riedman-Dangler Counseling will be collecting school supplies for families in need, for the upcoming 2015-2016. This can be dropped off at 919 Winton Rd. S. Suite 105. Feel free to call 241-0101 if you have questions. Thank-you!


Feel free to share your thoughts or ideas of ways to help those families who are affected by poverty.



Random Acts of Kindness Week Feb. 8- Feb. 14

Posted on February 7, 2015 at 2:33 PM Comments comments (11)


This week is designated as Random Acts of Kindness Week. I have blogged about the importance of this choice before; not with just a particular week of the year. But practicing this on a daily basis, as well.

Research indicates that people who practice this are happier and more resilient; not to mention the positive impact it can have on the receiver.

I would like to add a different spin on this, at this time. Along with doing random acts of kindness for others, make sure to also be kind to yourself. Yes, kindness to yourself! This is neither selfish nor greedy. In fact, quite the opposite. Being kind to ourselves is very healthy and necessary.

In an article written by Rick Hanson, he states that “… taking care of yourself has good ripple effects for others. Deliberately do a small thing that feeds you—a little rest, some exercise, some time for yourself—and then notice how this affects your relationships.”

Try practice changing any negative self-talk you may engage in; to more positive self-talk such as “I am a hard worker.” “It is okay for me to take a break and take care of my needs.” “It’s okay to make mistakes. Everyone does and sometimes we learn the best lessons this way.”

 I invite you to think of ways you can be kind to yourself this week and, more importantly, to keep this self care going. Remember you matter; you are unique and have valuable gifts.

                      Let’s support one another!
 
    Feel free to list other ideasfor kindness to ourselves and others.


Rss_feed